ALS Caregivers

Caregiving is willingly undertaken out of love and devotion to the person with ALS and can be a source of great personal satisfaction. Yet, over time, caregiving exacts an enormous emotional toll, and can adversely affect the caregiver’s physical and psychological health, threatening their ability to continue providing care. Concern for the ALS patient often causes the caregiver to overlook her/his own needs such as

• Eating properly,
• Getting enough rest,
• Taking time to pursue one’s own interests.

Primarily, caregiving is provided by family members. Family caregivers provide care day and night, over weekends and on demand. Caregiving can include personal care, assistance with mobility in the home, transportation, housework, and grocery shopping, along with looking after other family members’ needs. Caregivers are often employed outside the home and may be the primary source of household income which adds even more demands, responsibilities and stress. The family caregiver – spouse, partner, adult child, parent, brother, sister — needs acknowledgement and support in the process of starting and maintaining the care-providing relationship.

Respite Program
Howard I. Abrams In-Home Care Program
Care Connection
Calendar of Support Groups
Caring Bridge
Coping with Burnout
Caring About Someone with ALS
Caregiving...When a Loved one has ALS brochure


 

The ALS Association Greater Philadelphia Chapter
321 Norristown Road - Suite 260, Ambler, PA 19002
215-643-5434

The ALS Association is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization and donations are tax deductible to the full extent of the law.